How to Capitalize on Importer Security Filing (10+2)

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Sometimes opportunities present themselves in the unlikeliest places—in the bureaucracy of Customs compliance, for example. When U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) introduced the idea of Importer Security Filing (10+2) early in 2008, many global shippers and consignees greeted the proposal with reservations.

The mandate requires importers to electronically submit a security filing specifying 10 data elements plus an additional two carrier requirements before cargo is permitted entry into the United States by vessel. The filing tasks consignees and carriers with collecting and conveying necessary shipment information to CBP 24 hours prior to loading at a foreign port.

Unlike other CBP directives such as Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism (C-TPAT), shippers don't have a choice whether or not to comply with 10+2. They do have a choice in how they embrace change.

Security regulations are increasing the complexity of supply chain management. Much of this enforcement is driven by perceived or real threats, and efforts to improve cargo security abroad and at home continue to grow in importance.

Businesses that resist change and continue to look at increased regulation as a challenge will struggle with integration and compliance. For others, 10+2 is an opportunity to drive business process improvement.

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