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Trends—May 2010<br />

Trends—May 2010

Despite Interruptions European Integrators Express Themselves When an ash cloud from Iceland’s Eyjafjallajökull volcano forced the closure of most European airports and airspace in April 2010, express carriers TNT and DHL activated contingency plans and ramped up ground operations to cope with the service disruption. "The ground network allowed TNT to keep delivering customers’ goods […]

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Global Logistics—April 2010<br />

Global Logistics—April 2010

Kiwirail Kudos The Port of Auckland, New Zealand, is bringing marine transport directly to shipper doorsteps with the debut of its new Wiri-to-Waitemata seaport rail link. The intermodal shuttle connection helps exporters and importers drive efficiency and increase flexibility by enabling them to drop off and pick up containers without negotiating Auckland’s motorways. Shippers can […]

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Trends—April 2010<br />

Trends—April 2010

Logistics IT: Keying Into Shipper Demand Inbound Logistics’ annual Top 100 Logistics IT Providers survey and outreach canvasses solutions providers to understand the challenges and opportunities their customers confront as they navigate the global supply chain. How and where shippers direct logistics technology spend exposes broader trends in the transportation and logistics space. Companies invest […]

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Global Logistics—March 2010<br />

Global Logistics—March 2010

CEVA Goes Zoom Zoom Mazda has signed a three-year agreement with Dutch 3PL CEVA Logistics to manage spare parts distribution throughout Italy. CEVA collects parts daily from the automobile manufacturer’s warehouse in Klagenfurt, Austria, and transports them to its DC outside Bologna. The 3PL sorts and distributes an estimated 120,000 packages to 140 Mazda dealers […]

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Trends–March 2010<br />

Trends–March 2010

Alaska Gambles on Arctic ‘Pipeline’ America’s Last Frontier could be on the edge of a new front for global trade if Congressman Don Young’s (R-AK) vision for an arctic port becomes reality. Alaska, which is wild by nature, also has a reputation for bringing impetuous infrastructure projects to the table—for example, the much-maligned “Bridge to […]

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Global Logistics—February 2010

Global Logistics—February 2010

Middle East Logistics Heads North The Middle East’s express, freight forwarding, and logistics sectors are expected to weather a global depression and experience considerable growth during the coming years, according to Middle East Transport and Logistics 2010, a new report from Transport Intelligence, a Wiltshire, U.K.-based research firm. Despite recent problems in Dubai, foundations are […]

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Trends—February 2010

Trends—February 2010

The Little Railroad That Did Small railroad communities used to be widespread across the United States. Rural transportation and commerce were railroad-tied, each dependent on the other. In western New York towns such as Livonia, the past was very much aligned with the tracks. So is its future, thanks to a little foresight and determination. […]

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Global Logistics—January 2010<br />

Global Logistics—January 2010

Dutch Centrism: If the Clog Fits… Given its accessible location and proximity to two of the world’s great port cities—Amsterdam and Rotterdam—the Netherlands has historically been a center of commerce and trade. A new study, High Quality, Competitive Costs: Benchmarking the Netherlands as a Gateway to Europe, suggests the country’s reputation for cargo distribution—in terms […]

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Trends—January 2010<br />

Trends—January 2010

Guaging the Future of Marine Rail Rail intermodal solutions have become an important component of the U.S. supply chain as capacity, cost, and sustainability concerns warrant more transportation flexibility. The hitch for shippers is the time it takes to re-handle cargo, switch modes, and turn assets and inventory. Rail intermodal requires better forecasts, greater visibility, […]

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Global Logistics—December 2009

Electronics Manufacturing Switches Current Outsourcing manufacturing to China remains a viable strategy for many global companies. But the country’s developing economy, expanding consumer base, rising labor costs—and increasing global competition—has some industries reconsidering where they source product. Labor costs, total landed costs, and insourcing by original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) are slowing the migration of high-tech […]

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